My Google Diary for The Great Gatsby

My Google Diary for The Great Gatsby

My Google Diary for The Great GatsbyThe Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

 

When I read, I ask a LOT of questions. Here’s some stuff I searched or wondered about while reading The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

From my review:

I loved the writing.  It was simple, charming, and witty – an interesting contrast to the much deeper story going on.  The last line about how we can’t escape from the past points out that even though as Americans we say that anyone can achieve wealth, happiness and equality, the truth is we keep getting sucked into the rules of the past....Read More

Music

My number one complaint about the movie adaption by Baz Luhrmann was I didn’t like the music. I wanted some real jazz.  The book mentions a lot of specific songs, so I made a YouTube playlist for you of the songs mentioned in The Great Gatsby. If the video above doesn’t work, you can see the playlist here.

“The piece is known,” he concluded lustily, “as Vladimir Tostoff’s Jazz History of the World.”

– F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (p. 49).

Vladimir is not real :(

Books

The Rise of the Colored Empires by Goddard is mentioned by Tom. It’s not a real book, but the title is really similar to The Rising Tide of Color Against White World-Supremacy, by Lothrop Stoddard that I found on Wiki.  The Stoddard book was written in the 20s and is about “scientific racism.” I definitely won’t be reading it.

[Nick] sat down discreetly in the living-room and read a chapter of Simon Called Peter— either it was terrible stuff or the whiskey distorted things, because it didn’t make any sense to me.

-F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (p. 29).

I think this book, Simon Called Peter, is out of print because it has like 4 ratings on Goodreads. And all I could find about it was that it was really popular in the 20s and was controversial because of the sex and religion in the book. Huh. Wonder if it would be controversial now… (Source)

Places

“Two studies. One of them I call Montauk Point— The Gulls, and the other I call Montauk Point— The Sea.”

-F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (p. 32).

This is some of the riveting conversation at the party with Tom and his mistress (um in the book the parties are not as flashy as the movie. They are really quite lame).  But hey if the guy at the party did paintings of a real place, I want to see.

Montauk Point Lighthouse.  Ooooh pretty :)

Montauk Point – The sea :)

The city seen from the Queensboro Bridge is always the city seen for the first time, in its first wild promise of all the mystery and the beauty in the world.

-F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (p. 68).

Queensboro Bridge.  I want to go to New York.

Quotes

Americans, while occasionally willing to be serfs, have always been obstinate about being peasantry.

– F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (p. 88).

That is so oddly true.

“See!” he cried triumphantly. “It’s a bona-fide piece of printed matter. It fooled me. This fella’s a regular Belasco. It’s a triumph. What thoroughness! What realism!

– F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (pp. 45-46).

I totally freak out about books like that, too. But I wondered about the Belasco reference. He was a theatrical producer. I’m not the only one who was confused by the reference because the wiki page explains it like this:

 “The Owl Eyed Man,” who says of Gatsby “This fella’s a regular Belasco,” commenting on the theatrical (meaning ironically false) nature of Gatsby’s giant library. In other words, “The Owl Eyed Man” is noting Gatsby’s artificiality, comparing it to that of a stage player, by his amazement that the books, unlike Gatsby, are genuine. – Source

Wow. Look at the useless stuff you learn on this blog. I hope you play a lot of Trivial Pursuit. Dude I should play Trivial Pursuit….

Movie Trailer

 

About F. Scott Fitzgerald

f scott fitzgerald

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was an American writer of novels and short stories, whose works have been seen as evocative of the Jazz Age, a term he himself allegedly coined. He is regarded as one of the greatest twentieth century writers. Fitzgerald was of the self-styled "Lost Generation," Americans born in the 1890s who came of age during World War I. He finished four novels, left a fifth unfinished, and wrote dozens of short stories that treat themes of youth, despair, and age. He was married to Zelda Fitzgerald.

Book Review: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Book Review: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Book Review: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott FitzgeraldThe Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Published: 1925
180 pages
Genres: Adult Fiction, Classic
Source: Purchased

 
The Short, Sweet, and Spoiler-Free Blurb:

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s.
5 Stars

I don’t know how I made it through high school without reading this classic, but I’m so glad I get to come back to books like this and read them as an adult.  I’m sure I would have learned stuff in high school, but I feel like I’m getting more appreciation out of books like this as I get older.

The only thing I knew about this book before I started reading was that it was a shallow love story that ends with the girl dumping the poor, innocent guy….or something.  And yes that is the plot, but I think the story can also be about the American dream and who it’s really available to.  What is the American dream? Is it just getting money and it doesn’t matter how? Did we really get away from social inequality?  I hadn’t really thought about any of that before reading this book.  It made me wonder what my American dream is.  Do I just want to get lots of money, a big house, and tons of stuff? Or is there more to it than that?  Without spoiling the end, I feel like Mr. Fitzgerald’s opinion on the matter is that some people are born to live the American dream and some aren’t – and there isn’t much you can do to change it.  The fate of Daisy and Gatsby really brings that tragic idea home.

The parties were unreal. I was drooling over the mention of all the food.  I couldn’t help but imagine the Dowager Countess from Downton Abbey coming to Gatsby’s house and being appalled at what Americans called “a dinner party.”   My mind was buzzing with all the practical details and sheer amount of money that it would take to feed two dinners and tons of alcohol to that many people… But the parties and glamour are just covering up the fact that most of these people are shady, immoral, hypocritical and just plain unhappy.  Especially Tom and his wife Daisy.

I loved the writing.  It was simple, charming, and witty – an interesting contrast to the much deeper story going on.  The last line about how we can’t escape from the past points out that even though as Americans we say that anyone can achieve wealth, happiness and equality, the truth is we keep getting sucked into the rules of the past.

The only thing I thought was overdone was the symbolic Eye Doctor bilboard in the ash valley. Don’t let the symbolic Eye Doctor Ad/God’s Judgement fall on you on the way out.

Overall, a novel that got me really thinking about life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness in the context of a beautiful, tragic, and romantic story.

Content Rating: None.

About F. Scott Fitzgerald

f scott fitzgerald

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was an American writer of novels and short stories, whose works have been seen as evocative of the Jazz Age, a term he himself allegedly coined. He is regarded as one of the greatest twentieth century writers. Fitzgerald was of the self-styled "Lost Generation," Americans born in the 1890s who came of age during World War I. He finished four novels, left a fifth unfinished, and wrote dozens of short stories that treat themes of youth, despair, and age. He was married to Zelda Fitzgerald.